Ex-boyfriend guilty of exposing children to meth lab materials in Fort Mill

jmcfadden@heraldonline.comNovember 7, 2013 

Robert James Rudock, 41, was convicted of child endangerment, according to a news release from the York County Solicitor’s Office. He was sentenced to four years in prison.

— A jury on Wednesday found a Charlotte man guilty of storing materials and chemicals used to make meth while living with a Fort Mill woman and her four children last year.

Robert James Rudock, 41, was convicted of child endangerment, according to a news release from the York County Solicitor’s Office. He was sentenced to four years in prison.

On May 7, 2012, a Baxter Village homeowner found boxes belonging to Rudock in her storage closet, the release states. He lived there for a short period of time and left some of his belongings at the house when he moved out.

The homeowner called authorities, who searched the box and found large amounts of iodine, red phosphorous, glass containers, glass tubing, rubber tubing, rubber gloves, a gas mask, coffee filters, digital scales, a digital pH tester, a digital thermometer and meth-cooking residue, the release states. Investigators with the county’s multijurisdictional drug enforcement unit found 47 doses of pseudoephedrine in the box.

Pseudoephedrine, found in common cold medicines, is a key ingredient in making meth.

The lab was not active at the time, and police did not find any meth, said Matthew Shelton, one of two assistant York County solicitors who prosecuted Rudock.

Police charged Rudock with manufacturing methamphetamine, manufacturing methamphetamine in proximity to a school, trafficking pseudoephedrine and child endangerment.

Rudock went to trial on all his charges before the manufacturing charges were dismissed because the judge planned to issue a directed verdict, which would have taken the decision out of the jury's hands, said Mark McKinnon, Rudock's York County public defender.

Solicitors dropped the manufacturing charges, McKinnon said, to avoid the directed verdict. Rudock was found not guilty of the trafficking charge.

The lab was not cooking meth at the time deputies found the materials, Shelton said: "He wasn’t in the process of making it."

Rudock and the woman had been in a relationship, Shelton said. While they were dating, he needed a place to live and moved in with her and her children for a couple of months. When they broke up, he took some, but not all, of his stuff.

The woman had no indication Rudock was involved with meth, although he made an off-hand comment about “some darker days,” Shelton said.

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